Mr GRIMLEY (Western Victoria) (12:08): My question is to the Minister for Road Safety and the TAC. 2019 was an awful year for road safety, with 263 lives lost. The Royal Australasian College of Surgeons says Victoria’s road safety plan is clearly not on target and must be morphed into a new strategy. This influential body, representing more than 1400 surgeons statewide, says the state’s road trauma is a serious public health problem of epidemic proportions. Different measures about how to reduce the road toll have been floated, including potentially copying the New South Wales disadvantaged learner drivers course, which offers 1000 free places on the state’s Safer Drivers Course each year to help young learner drivers from disadvantaged backgrounds, out-of-home care and Aboriginal communities who are financially unable to pay the normal $140 fee for the course. By engaging with at-risk drivers prior to an incident, the New South Wales government believe that they can indirectly reduce the road toll. My question is: can the minister indicate whether the state government currently funds a similar program, and if not, are there any plans to do so?

Mr GRIMLEY (Western Victoria) (12:12): I thank the minister for her response. I have had dealings with the L2P program through the police stations, where the volunteers come, and it is a fantastic program. But aside from the L2P program, what additional steps is the government taking or what other programs are in place to further engage with these at-risk drivers during this learner and probationary phase of their licence?